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Four Energy Questions We’ll Be Watching In 2017

Inside Energy is launching a new feature with our partner radio station, KUVO in Denver, kicking off each Monday with a brief yet electrifying (pun intended, of course) discussion on energy. This week, we looked at some of the big questions we’ll be keeping a close eye on in 2017, from electric vehicles to energy regulations.

North Dakota coal workers mine 30 million tons of lignite each year. The coal's then burned at nearby power plants.

Coal State Considers Carbon Future Under Trump

The Obama administration imposed strict carbon emissions limits on states. But that rule’s likely to be undone when Donald Trump assumes the presidency. So states like North Dakota are wondering what’s next for emissions, and moving forward with plans of their own.

Lake Sakakawea lies at the heart of the Fort Berthold reservation.

While One Tribe Fights Oil, Another Cautiously Embraces It

While the Standing Rock Sioux fights the Dakota Access Pipeline, a different tribal nation 150 miles up the Missouri River has already welcomed oil development onto its land. But development comes with risks and a responsibility to protect the environment.

This chart shows oil/gas and coal company contributions to presidential candidate committees. It includes contributions from company PACs as well as individuals employed by the companies who donated at least $200. While coal interests have retained their strong preference for Republican presidential candidates, oil and gas interests have shifted their spending to Clinton in the general election. With a month to go before the election, oil and gas interests had spent roughly the same amount on candidates who did not make it past the primaries as they did on Trump and Clinton combined. Note that this does not reflect super PAC spending. View the data used to make this graphic as a spreadsheet.

Surprises In Oil And Gas Campaign Spending

Fossil fuel companies have a history of backing Republican candidates. But this year’s unusual presidential campaign appears to be having a strange ripple effect on political giving — at least from the oil and gas industry.

Routt County Treasurer Brita Horn answered questions and listened to comments during a public meeting in October.

In Confidential Deal, Coal Company Pays Back Taxes To Colorado County

Peabody Energy paid nearly one point eight million dollars in overdue taxes this week to a rural county in western Colorado, resolving, for now, a serious funding concern for a tiny school district there. Communities all over the country count on revenue from fossil fuel extraction to pay for basics like schools and roads. But with the downturn in coal, oil and gas, that steady stream of energy dollars is no longer assured.