Jacob Brooks of Ann Arbor, MI works on one of the many "tarpees" erected in the camp, a winter dwelling developed by Paul Cheyok'ten Wagner.

Dakota Access Protest Camp Faces Winter And Evacuation Orders

Protesters have been camped out on federal land at the Dakota Access construction site in North Dakota for months, and now winter has arrived, dumping almost two week of snow on the encampment the last week of November. The winter storm hit just before news that president-elect Donald Trump indicated he supports completion of the pipeline.

In this Sept. 8, 2016 file photo Standing Rock Tribal Chairman Dave Archambault spoke to the media.

Standing Rock Called A “Spiritual War” For Native American Protestors

Standing Rock Sioux chairman Dave Archambault and other protest organizers have said they plan to stay at the Oceti Sakowin camp in North Dakota and continue with protests against the Dakota Access pipeline. This comes after the tribe received a letter from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers that said all federal lands north of the Cannonball River will be closed to public access Dec. 5 for “safety concerns.”