Lake Sakakawea lies at the heart of the Fort Berthold reservation.

While One Tribe Fights Oil, Another Cautiously Embraces It

While the Standing Rock Sioux fights the Dakota Access Pipeline, a different tribal nation 150 miles up the Missouri River has already welcomed oil development onto its land. But development comes with risks and a responsibility to protect the environment.

A protest camp of tepees and tents along the Cannonball River in North Dakota to protest the Dakota Access Pipeline.  September 2016.

Tribal Consultation At Heart Of Pipeline Fight

Consultation, the formal process of communication between tribes and the federal government, has become a central issue in the fight over the Dakota Access Pipeline. But this is not the first time tribes have sued over consultation violations. These lawsuits are becoming more and more common thanks, in part, to actions taken by the Obama Administration.

Dallas Goldtooth of the Indigenous Environmental Network voices his opposition to the Dakota Access Pipeline while law enforcement monitors the protest on the street in front of the North Dakota Capitol. Highway Patrol Capt. Bryan Niewind offered him a megaphone to amplify his voice.

Pipeline Battle Draws Hundreds To Remote North Dakota

A battle over a major new oil pipeline is gaining momentum on the ground while it plays out in court. It’s drawing hundreds of Native Americans from tribes throughout the United States to rural North Dakota. They’re hoping to prevent the pipeline from going under the Missouri River next to an Indian reservation.