After Home Explosion, Who Wants To Live On Twilight Ave?

A home went up in flames in April on Twilight Avenue north of Denver, killing two people. Now, the investigation into what happened is underway, clean-up is ongoing, lawsuits are being filed and people who live in that small community are worried- not only about their safety but about the value of their homes. The explosion was caused by a small pipeline leaking gas into the home, owned by oil and gas giant Anadarko. In this part of Colorado, energy infrastructure like that is everywhere. “I don’t want to live there anymore.

Inside Energy Teams Up With Reveal In ‘Standing Rock And Beyond’

The pipeline protests at the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation last year drew national attention. Inside Energy teamed up with the Center for Investigative Reporting’s Reveal to go behind the scenes and meet the young people who started the fight. The program looks at how those protests put at-risk teens on a healthier path, and how other Native American tribes are grappling with energy projects on their sovereign land.

Pipeline Drama Casts Shadow Over Oil Industry

The oil industry’s on edge while protesters try to stop the Dakota Access Pipeline, and it’s not alone. Residents who live near the protest camps in North Dakota have to cope with an influx of people the area, posing traffic hazards and putting locals on alert.

Pipeline Building Boom Raises Safety Concerns

On the morning of April 29, a natural gas transmission line exploded in a field in Salem Township in western Pennsylvania. The blast was so powerful it ripped a 12-foot crater into the landscape, burned a section of the field with a quarter-mile radius and threw a 25-foot section of the 30-inch steel pipeline 100 feet away. At the time of the explosion, a 26-year-old man was in his house, a few hundred feet away. He was badly burned, and his home destroyed. When local fire chief Bob Rosatti arrived at the scene, the flames were so hot, he had to stay in his truck. “They were massive—I would say 300 feet at the least,” Rosatti says. “That was the biggest fireball I’d ever seen in my life.