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Standing Ground At Standing Rock

Inside Energy is working on a documentary about the Dakota Access Pipeline controversy and tribal sovereignty issues raised by the Standing Rock Sioux. Does the current system of tribal consultation work for tribes? Does it work for energy infrastructure projects? Stay tuned for a full treatment of these issues. In the meantime, here’s a short look at some of the concerns from both sides.

A section of the Dakota Access pipeline awaits construction.

What’s Next For Dakota Access?

On Sunday, the Army Corps of Engineers denied a permit to complete the Dakota Access Pipeline. After months of protest and months of construction, parties with vested interests in the pipeline are wondering what’s next. For thousands of Native Americans and climate activists who have joined the Standing Rock Sioux’s protest against the pipeline, and are camped out in blizzard conditions, the question is — should they leave or should they stay? At the same time, the oil industry and legal experts are trying to make sense of the decision and what it means for the longterm project’s fate.

Late afternoon light illuminates a portion of an encampment called the Oceti Sakowin Camp near from the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation in southcentral North Dakota on Nov. 19, 2016.

Standing Rock Called A “Spiritual War” For Native American Protestors

Standing Rock Sioux chairman Dave Archambault and other protest organizers have said they plan to stay at the Oceti Sakowin camp in North Dakota and continue with protests against the Dakota Access pipeline. This comes after the tribe received a letter from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers that said all federal lands north of the Cannonball River will be closed to public access Dec. 5 for “safety concerns.”

Police arrested more than a hundred protesters camped out along the Dakota Access pipeline route on October 27, 2016.

Police And Pipeline Protesters Clash In North Dakota

What started months ago as a dispute between a tribe and the federal government has escalated into clashes between protesters and police. More than 140 people were arrested Thursday during a tense standoff between police and Dakota Access pipeline protesters.