Energy In North Dakota

While thousands of protesters camp in tents and tepees to protest the Dakota Access Pipeline in North Dakota, the oil industry continues to advocate for the pipeline's construction.

Pipeline Drama Casts Shadow Over Oil Industry

The oil industry’s on edge while protesters try to stop the Dakota Access Pipeline, and it’s not alone. Residents who live near the protest camps in North Dakota have to cope with an influx of people the area, posing traffic hazards and putting locals on alert.

People continue to camp in tepees and tents along the Cannonball River in North Dakota to protest the Dakota Access Pipeline. The oil pipeline is slated to cross through Army Corps of Engineers land about a mile from this camp.

Tribal Consultation At Heart Of Pipeline Fight

Consultation, the formal process of communication between tribes and the federal government, has become a central issue in the fight over the Dakota Access Pipeline. But this is not the first time tribes have sued over consultation violations. These lawsuits are becoming more and more common thanks, in part, to actions taken by the Obama Administration.

Quiltman Sahme, left, and son Tiwani sit outside their tent along the border of the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation in North Dakota where they're protesting the Dakota Access oil pipeline. They're from the Warm Springs Indian Reservation in Oregon, which is trying to prevent Nestle from bottling water from a nearby stream.

Fight Feels Familiar For Tribes At Pipeline Protest

Fights past and present over environmental issues have compelled Native Americans from tribes across the country to stand in solidarity with the Standing Rock Sioux in its battle to defeat the Dakota Access oil pipeline. This gathering of nations, meanwhile, could mark a turning point for tribes as they seek greater say in what happens to their land.

People continue to camp in tepees and tents along the Cannonball River in North Dakota to protest the Dakota Access Pipeline. The oil pipeline is slated to cross through Army Corps of Engineers land about a mile from this camp.

Many Reasons, One Cause In Pipeline Protest

Opposition to the Dakota Access pipeline continues to grow beyond its North Dakota roots, with solidarity protests Tuesday in dozens of cities across the country and the world. People are protesting for many different reasons but with one goal—stopping the pipeline.

People raise their fists in the air in solidarity as a group of canoes arrives in a protest camp that sprang up to demonstrate against the Energy Transfer Partners’ Dakota Access oil pipeline near the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation in Cannon Ball, North Dakota. The canoe flotilla had representatives of tribes from the across the Pacific Northwest and navigated the Missouri River from Bismarck to Cannon Ball to show their support.

Tribes Win One Fight, Lose Another In Pipeline Protest

News that construction must stop on part of a controversial oil pipeline is drawing a mixed reaction from the people protesting it. That’s because even though a judge says work on the project can continue, the Obama administration surprised everyone when it announced it would block construction. Now, the fight over the Dakota Access pipeline is ramping up as it spreads from North Dakota to the nation’s capital.

Inside Energy News

BNI Coal near Center, North Dakota mines about 4.5 million tons of lignite coal a year. Photo by Rebecca Jacobson/Inside Energy

Trump Or Clinton?: What’s At Stake For Energy States

Election day is creeping closer. And the next president could change the energy landscape of states that rely on coal, oil and gas. Inside Energy’s Amy Sisk looks at how the next president would affect energy-state North Dakota.

The Boundary Dam CCS project is one of just two operating CCS projects at coal-fired power plants in North America.

Clean Coal: Fact Or Fiction?

During the second Presidential debate, Donald Trump responded to a question about energy policy by saying, “There is a thing called clean coal. Coal will last for a thousand years in this country.” An Inside Energy follower named David asked us, “#CleanCoal: True or false prophecy?” We try to answer that question.


Energy 101 For Presidential Candidates

Questions over the country’s energy future surfaced in the Presidential debate Sunday night. It was a surprising five minutes of policy discussion in a tense debate that focused on character attacks.

In Case You Missed It

This animation shows the levelized cost of energy for new power sources, in 2015 dollars per MWh. Data is from the U.S. Energy Information Administration’s Annual Energy Outlook, 2010 to 2016. Values have been adjusted for inflation. This chart shows advanced coal with carbon capture and storage, advanced combined cycle natural gas with carbon capture and storage, hydroelectric, advanced nuclear, solar PV, and onshore wind. For more technologies (i.e. natural gas combustion turbines, offshore wind, concentrating solar), see this table.

The Numbers Behind Our Clean Power Plan Video (Or Lightning Bolts And The Saturn V Rocket!)

Inside Energy recently made a video about what the Clean Power Plan means for you. In that video, we used a lot of numbers: 98 quadrillion Btu (the total energy used in the United States last year), 100 lightning bolts (the amount of energy each American used last year…ish), 150,000 (the number of people employed in the U.S. Coal industry), and more. In the video, we had mere seconds to share those numbers. But at Inside Energy, we like to get real nerdy about energy. So we’re sharing the stories behind those numbers.