Energy In Wyoming

A truck sprays water to keep down the dust at Cloud Peak Energy's Antelope mine. June 2, 2016.

Trump Promised Big On Coal. Can He Deliver?

Coal country is celebrating Donald Trump’s election victory. Support for Trump was strong from Appalachia to Wyoming, and people have high hopes he can reverse coal’s recent downturn. But can he?

Juan Carlos Carpio is the CEO of Viridis Eolia, a company interested in developing wind in Wyoming.

Political Change Powers Up Wyoming’s Wind Industry

The future for Wyoming’s wind industry is finally looking up. There are few places in the country with more wind energy potential than Wyoming, but the state has seen almost no new wind turbines built in six years, even while wind has boomed in the rest of the country. Depending on who you ask, the challenges have been political, technical or both. But now, the outlook is improving on all fronts.

A 2014 explosion at the Williams Opal natural gas processing plant forced the evacuation of the town, and caused a spike in the price of natural gas.

No Fines, No Follow-Up After Massive Explosion At Wyoming Natural Gas Plant

In 2014, a massive explosion tore through the Williams natural gas processing plant in Opal. It forced the evacuation of the southwestern Wyoming town and caused a spike in the price of natural gas. Wyoming’s Occupational Safety and Health Administration conducted an investigation in the aftermath and found a number of safety violations. But the agency never collected the corresponding fines and never released a final report about the investigation.

Inside Energy News

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Four Energy Questions We’ll Be Watching In 2017

Inside Energy is launching a new feature with our partner radio station, KUVO in Denver, kicking off each Monday with a brief yet electrifying (pun intended, of course) discussion on energy. This week, we looked at some of the big questions we’ll be keeping a close eye on in 2017, from electric vehicles to energy regulations.

North Dakota coal workers mine 30 million tons of lignite each year. The coal's then burned at nearby power plants.

Coal State Considers Carbon Future Under Trump

The Obama administration imposed strict carbon emissions limits on states. But that rule’s likely to be undone when Donald Trump assumes the presidency. So states like North Dakota are wondering what’s next for emissions, and moving forward with plans of their own.

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