Energy In Wyoming

Juan Carlos Carpio is the CEO of Viridis Eolia, a company interested in developing wind in Wyoming.

Political Change Powers Up Wyoming’s Wind Industry

The future for Wyoming’s wind industry is finally looking up. There are few places in the country with more wind energy potential than Wyoming, but the state has seen almost no new wind turbines built in six years, even while wind has boomed in the rest of the country. Depending on who you ask, the challenges have been political, technical or both. But now, the outlook is improving on all fronts.

A 2014 explosion at the Williams Opal natural gas processing plant forced the evacuation of the town, and caused a spike in the price of natural gas.

No Fines, No Follow-Up After Massive Explosion At Wyoming Natural Gas Plant

In 2014, a massive explosion tore through the Williams natural gas processing plant in Opal. It forced the evacuation of the southwestern Wyoming town and caused a spike in the price of natural gas. Wyoming’s Occupational Safety and Health Administration conducted an investigation in the aftermath and found a number of safety violations. But the agency never collected the corresponding fines and never released a final report about the investigation.

Paul Martin is the president of Intermountain Wind, a wind development company.

Wyoming Considers Raising Nation’s Only Wind Tax

Legislators see the increase as a way to raise revenues in the face of a massive budget shortfall due to a drop in coal, oil and gas production. But wind developers say it’s a dangerous gamble for a state that has some of the best wind power potential in the nation.

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Trump Or Clinton? What’s At Stake For Energy States

Election day is creeping closer. And the next president could change the energy landscape of states that rely on coal, oil and gas. Inside Energy’s Amy Sisk looks at how the next president would affect energy-state North Dakota.

The Boundary Dam CCS project is one of just two operating CCS projects at coal-fired power plants in North America.

Clean Coal: Fact Or Fiction?

During the second Presidential debate, Donald Trump responded to a question about energy policy by saying, “There is a thing called clean coal. Coal will last for a thousand years in this country.” An Inside Energy follower named David asked us, “#CleanCoal: True or false prophecy?” We try to answer that question.


Energy 101 For Presidential Candidates

Questions over the country’s energy future surfaced in the Presidential debate Sunday night. It was a surprising five minutes of policy discussion in a tense debate that focused on character attacks.

In Case You Missed It

This animation shows the levelized cost of energy for new power sources, in 2015 dollars per MWh. Data is from the U.S. Energy Information Administration’s Annual Energy Outlook, 2010 to 2016. Values have been adjusted for inflation. This chart shows advanced coal with carbon capture and storage, advanced combined cycle natural gas with carbon capture and storage, hydroelectric, advanced nuclear, solar PV, and onshore wind. For more technologies (i.e. natural gas combustion turbines, offshore wind, concentrating solar), see this table.

The Numbers Behind Our Clean Power Plan Video (Or Lightning Bolts And The Saturn V Rocket!)

Inside Energy recently made a video about what the Clean Power Plan means for you. In that video, we used a lot of numbers: 98 quadrillion Btu (the total energy used in the United States last year), 100 lightning bolts (the amount of energy each American used last year…ish), 150,000 (the number of people employed in the U.S. Coal industry), and more. In the video, we had mere seconds to share those numbers. But at Inside Energy, we like to get real nerdy about energy. So we’re sharing the stories behind those numbers.