This animation shows the levelized cost of energy for new power sources, in 2015 dollars per MWh. Data is from the U.S. Energy Information Administration’s Annual Energy Outlook, 2010 to 2016. Values have been adjusted for inflation. This chart shows advanced coal with carbon capture and storage, advanced combined cycle natural gas with carbon capture and storage, hydroelectric, advanced nuclear, solar PV, and onshore wind. For more technologies (i.e. natural gas combustion turbines, offshore wind, concentrating solar), see this table.

The Numbers Behind Our Clean Power Plan Video (Or Lightning Bolts And The Saturn V Rocket!)

Inside Energy recently made a video about what the Clean Power Plan means for you. In that video, we used a lot of numbers: 98 quadrillion Btu (the total energy used in the United States last year), 100 lightning bolts (the amount of energy each American used last year…ish), 150,000 (the number of people employed in the U.S. Coal industry), and more. In the video, we had mere seconds to share those numbers. But at Inside Energy, we like to get real nerdy about energy. So we’re sharing the stories behind those numbers.

In the same Fort Collins neighborhood as this  active oil and gas well, there are supposedly several abandoned oil and gas wells that Inside Energy could not locate.

Living On Top Of Forgotten Oil And Gas Wells

In many parts of the West, areas that are now houses and schools and shopping centers were once oil and gas fields. There’s little in the way of a visible legacy, but hidden underground, there are hundreds of thousands of abandoned wells. An Inside Energy investigation has discovered that in many communities, new development is happening on top of those old wells.

A haul truck at Alpha Natural Resources' Eagle Butte coal mine.

In Latest Move On Climate, Obama Administration Halts Coal Leasing

The federal government has temporarily halted coal leasing on public lands while it reviews its coal program. Forty percent of the coal mined in the United States comes from publicly-owned minerals beneath federal land, mostly in Wyoming. The government review will address whether taxpayers are getting a fair return on that coal, as well as how to square the coal program with the country’s new climate goals.