In this Sept. 8, 2016 file photo Standing Rock Tribal Chairman Dave Archambault spoke to the media.

Standing Rock Called A “Spiritual War” For Native American Protestors

Standing Rock Sioux chairman Dave Archambault and other protest organizers have said they plan to stay at the Oceti Sakowin camp in North Dakota and continue with protests against the Dakota Access pipeline. This comes after the tribe received a letter from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers that said all federal lands north of the Cannonball River will be closed to public access Dec. 5 for “safety concerns.”

Lake Sakakawea lies at the heart of the Fort Berthold reservation.

While One Tribe Fights Oil, Another Cautiously Embraces It

While the Standing Rock Sioux fights the Dakota Access Pipeline, a different tribal nation 150 miles up the Missouri River has already welcomed oil development onto its land. But development comes with risks and a responsibility to protect the environment.

Police arrested more than a hundred protesters camped out along the Dakota Access pipeline route on October 27, 2016.

Police And Pipeline Protesters Clash In North Dakota

What started months ago as a dispute between a tribe and the federal government has escalated into clashes between protesters and police. More than 140 people were arrested Thursday during a tense standoff between police and Dakota Access pipeline protesters.

While thousands of protesters camp in tents and tepees to protest the Dakota Access Pipeline in North Dakota, the oil industry continues to advocate for the pipeline's construction.

Pipeline Drama Casts Shadow Over Oil Industry

The oil industry’s on edge while protesters try to stop the Dakota Access Pipeline, and it’s not alone. Residents who live near the protest camps in North Dakota have to cope with an influx of people the area, posing traffic hazards and putting locals on alert.

People continue to camp in tepees and tents along the Cannonball River in North Dakota to protest the Dakota Access Pipeline. The oil pipeline is slated to cross through Army Corps of Engineers land about a mile from this camp.

Tribal Consultation At Heart Of Pipeline Fight

Consultation, the formal process of communication between tribes and the federal government, has become a central issue in the fight over the Dakota Access Pipeline. But this is not the first time tribes have sued over consultation violations. These lawsuits are becoming more and more common thanks, in part, to actions taken by the Obama Administration.

Quiltman Sahme, left, and son Tiwani sit outside their tent along the border of the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation in North Dakota where they're protesting the Dakota Access oil pipeline. They're from the Warm Springs Indian Reservation in Oregon, which is trying to prevent Nestle from bottling water from a nearby stream.

Fight Feels Familiar For Tribes At Pipeline Protest

Fights past and present over environmental issues have compelled Native Americans from tribes across the country to stand in solidarity with the Standing Rock Sioux in its battle to defeat the Dakota Access oil pipeline. This gathering of nations, meanwhile, could mark a turning point for tribes as they seek greater say in what happens to their land.

Many Reasons, One Cause In Pipeline Protest

Opposition to the Dakota Access pipeline continues to grow beyond its North Dakota roots, with solidarity protests Tuesday in dozens of cities across the country and the world. People are protesting for many different reasons but with one goal—stopping the pipeline.