Quiltman Sahme, left, and son Tiwani sit outside their tent along the border of the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation in North Dakota where they're protesting the Dakota Access oil pipeline. They're from the Warm Springs Indian Reservation in Oregon, which is trying to prevent Nestle from bottling water from a nearby stream.

Fight Feels Familiar For Tribes At Pipeline Protest

Fights past and present over environmental issues have compelled Native Americans from tribes across the country to stand in solidarity with the Standing Rock Sioux in its battle to defeat the Dakota Access oil pipeline. This gathering of nations, meanwhile, could mark a turning point for tribes as they seek greater say in what happens to their land.

People raise their fists in the air in solidarity as a group of canoes arrives in a protest camp that sprang up to demonstrate against the Energy Transfer Partners’ Dakota Access oil pipeline near the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation in Cannon Ball, North Dakota. The canoe flotilla had representatives of tribes from the across the Pacific Northwest and navigated the Missouri River from Bismarck to Cannon Ball to show their support.

Tribes Win One Fight, Lose Another In Pipeline Protest

News that construction must stop on part of a controversial oil pipeline is drawing a mixed reaction from the people protesting it. That’s because even though a judge says work on the project can continue, the Obama administration surprised everyone when it announced it would block construction. Now, the fight over the Dakota Access pipeline is ramping up as it spreads from North Dakota to the nation’s capital.

The 2015 leak at the Aliso Canyon natural gas storage facility near Los Angeles was a grim reminder of how devastating methane leaks can be. The Environmental Defense Fund estimates that the four-month leak will have the same 20-year climate impact as burning nearly a billion gallons of gasoline.

On The Hunt For Methane Leaks

Burning natural gas for electricity is much cleaner than coal. But there’s a problem – leaking methane, a potent greenhouse gas. Nearly 2 years ago Colorado implemented rules to try to limit methane leaks from natural gas infrastructure. Now the EPA is proposing to model federal rules on Colorado’s. Still finding and plugging leaks remains a challenge nationwide. In Pennsylvania, where thousands of gas wells and pipelines are working the Marcellus Shale, researchers are trying to figure out how much is leaking. For our Inside Energy project, The Allegheny Front’s Reid Frazier tagged along.

Donald Trump speaks to a packed arena at the Williston Basin Petroleum Conference in Bismarck, ND.

The Future Of U.S. Energy, According To Donald Trump

With the help of a few more delegates from a handful of states, including North Dakota, Donald Trump finally gathered enough to clinch the republican nomination. And with that news, the official Republican Presidential nominee rolled into Bismarck, North Dakota on Thursday.

On the trading floor of Arizona Public Service, all eyes are trained on the price of energy in California, especially when customer demand is low, but solar panels are producing the most power.

Getting Paid To Soak Up California Solar

The people who run our electricity grids are trying to figure out what to do with solar and wind power that is generated when no one needs it. Take California – there’s enough solar there now to serve more than three million homes. But during the day, especially in the spring, demand is low and generation is high. So, that clean power has to be sent elsewhere. Right now, its going across state lines to Arizona.