Police arrested more than a hundred protesters camped out along the Dakota Access pipeline route on October 27, 2016.

Police And Pipeline Protesters Clash In North Dakota

What started months ago as a dispute between a tribe and the federal government has escalated into clashes between protesters and police. More than 140 people were arrested Thursday during a tense standoff between police and Dakota Access pipeline protesters.

Juan Carlos Carpio is the CEO of Viridis Eolia, a company interested in developing wind in Wyoming.

Political Change Powers Up Wyoming’s Wind Industry

The future for Wyoming’s wind industry is finally looking up. There are few places in the country with more wind energy potential than Wyoming, but the state has seen almost no new wind turbines built in six years, even while wind has boomed in the rest of the country. Depending on who you ask, the challenges have been political, technical or both. But now, the outlook is improving on all fronts.

People continue to camp in tepees and tents along the Cannonball River in North Dakota to protest the Dakota Access Pipeline. The oil pipeline is slated to cross through Army Corps of Engineers land about a mile from this camp.

Tribal Consultation At Heart Of Pipeline Fight

Consultation, the formal process of communication between tribes and the federal government, has become a central issue in the fight over the Dakota Access Pipeline. But this is not the first time tribes have sued over consultation violations. These lawsuits are becoming more and more common thanks, in part, to actions taken by the Obama Administration.

Quiltman Sahme, left, and son Tiwani sit outside their tent along the border of the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation in North Dakota where they're protesting the Dakota Access oil pipeline. They're from the Warm Springs Indian Reservation in Oregon, which is trying to prevent Nestle from bottling water from a nearby stream.

Fight Feels Familiar For Tribes At Pipeline Protest

Fights past and present over environmental issues have compelled Native Americans from tribes across the country to stand in solidarity with the Standing Rock Sioux in its battle to defeat the Dakota Access oil pipeline. This gathering of nations, meanwhile, could mark a turning point for tribes as they seek greater say in what happens to their land.

Many Reasons, One Cause In Pipeline Protest

Opposition to the Dakota Access pipeline continues to grow beyond its North Dakota roots, with solidarity protests Tuesday in dozens of cities across the country and the world. People are protesting for many different reasons but with one goal—stopping the pipeline.